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Exhibition: Land and Memory at Studio Sixty Six—01.11.19 to 03.03.19

By Taymaz Valley on January 9, 2019

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Studio Sixty Six is having its first group exhibition of 2019 from January 11 to March 3. Titled Land and Memory, this exhibition brings together some of the gallery’s most passionate contemporary artists who share the love of landscape and the natural world.

Ranging from political to the poetic, these paintings, photographs and sculptures play with the trace left from one’s experiences and memories. These evoking gems, captured at times soberly and at other, abstractly, quietly share the infinite most beguiling and mesmerizingly. They lack distinguishable figures, yet they are there and humanity’s footprints are everywhere to be found within them.

Christine Fitzgerald shares haunting photographs of the sea and shore of Mexican Gulf from her Erosion series, with the crumbling man-made docks leading your eyes toward the horizon, dividing the calm sea and the vast heavens. These images would have been sentimental if they did not carry with them a warning to humanity. This gulf was here before us and its beauty will survive us. If we fail to grasp our role in the survival of life on this planet, nothing but memories will remain of us all.

Ranging from political to the poetic, these paintings, photographs and sculptures play with the trace left from one’s experiences and memories.

Leslie Hossack also plays with destruction, but from a contemporary war artist perspective with examples from her Kosovo and Jerusalem series included in the exhibition. The immense, dusty and brown landscape leading from a fortress to the Dead Sea, or the indistinguishable figures cutting the grass on Camp Film City Kosovo where the NATO troops are based, remind you of the violence and devastation that can be handed out by humanity. Rémi Thériault‘s Vimy Memorial makes that most famous Canadian landmark dedicated to fallen soldiers but a mere stretching shadow onto the French landscape.

Troy Moth also plays around with indistinguishable figures in his sculptures fashioned out of discarded forest wood, treated and stained in India ink, but I find optimism in them. Similar to Manon Labrosse‘s mysterious painted figures in the colourful nature settings, the poetic is also very much present in these works. Hope is part of those elevated expressions, because we are not done yet. I think Patrice Stanley‘s majestic landscapes impart precisely that longing for the better. The possibility of learning from our mistakes and changing the path to our destiny. After all, only those who forget the past are cursed to repeat it.


Land and Memory will be at Studio Sixty Six (858 Bank Street, unit 101) from January 11 until March 3, 2019. The opening reception takes place Friday January 11 from 6-9pm. RSVP online